Intranasal corticosteroid potency

Because of the inhibitory effect of corticosteroids on wound healing, a nasal corticosteroid should be used with caution in patients who have experienced recent nasal septal ulcers, recurrent epistaxis, nasal surgery or trauma, until healing has occurred. Although systemic corticoid effects typical of Cushing's syndrome are minimal with recommended doses of topical steroids, this potential increases with excessive doses. If recommended doses are exceeded with long-term use, or if individuals are particularly sensitive, symptoms of hypercorticism could occur including suppression of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal function and/or retardation of growth in pediatric patients. Therefore, larger than recommended doses of NASAREL should be avoided.

Nine placebo-controlled trials have demonstrated the effectiveness of dihydroergotamine nasal spray (Migranal), making it an option for nonoral medication. 30 Comparison with subcutaneous sumatriptan showed lower effectiveness but fewer adverse effects. 31 Intravenous dihydroergotamine, combined with antiemetics, may be a reasonable option in emergency departments. A meta-analysis showed comparable effectiveness to opiates and ketorolac when combined with an antiemetic, but inferiority to phenothiazines and triptans when used alone. 16 Trials comparing subcutaneous dihydroergotamine with subcutaneous sumatriptan showed that dihydroergotamine had inferior effectiveness but fewer adverse events and headache recurrences. 32

The avirulent Bartha's K strain of pseudorabies virus (PRV) was used to vaccinate 8 pigs at 10 weeks of age by the intransal route (experiment 1). On postvaccination days (PVD) 63 and 91, pigs were treated with corticosteroids. Viral shedding could not be detected. Explant cultures of trigeminal ganglia and tonsils did not produce virus. Four pigs with maternal antibody were vaccinated intranasally with Bartha's (attenuated) K strain of PRV at 10 weeks of age and were challenge exposed with a virulent strain of PRV on PVD 63 (experiment 2). Corticosteroid treatment, starting on postchallenge exposure day 70 (PVD 133) resulted in viral shedding in 1 of 4 pigs. In another pig of these 4, a 2nd corticosteroid treatment was required to trigger reactivation. In both pigs, sufficient reactivated virus was excreted to infect susceptible sentinel pigs. Restriction endonuclease analysis indicated that viruses isolated from the 2 pigs after challenge exposure and corticosteroid treatment were indistinguishable from the virulent virus. Evidence was not obtained for simultaneous excretion of vaccinal and virulent virus. Of 4 pigs without maternal antibody vaccinated twice with 1 of 2 inactivated PRV vaccines, challenge exposed on PVD 84, and treated with corticosteroids on postchallenge exposure day 63 (PVD 147), 1 was latently infected, as evidenced by the shedding of PRV (experiment 3). However, its sentinel pig remained noninfected.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

A 1-year placebo-controlled clinical growth study was conducted in 150 pediatric patients (ages 3 to 9 years) to assess the effect of FLONASE Nasal Spray (single daily dose of 200 mcg, the maximum approved dose) on growth velocity. From the primary population of 56 patients receiving FLONASE Nasal Spray and 52 receiving placebo, the point estimate for growth velocity with FLONASE Nasal Spray was  cm/year lower than that noted with placebo (95% confidence interval ranging from  cm/year lower than placebo to  cm/year higher than placebo). Thus, no statistically significant effect on growth was noted compared to placebo. No evidence of clinically relevant changes in HPA axis function or bone mineral density was observed as assessed by 12-hour urinary cortisol excretion and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively.

Intranasal corticosteroid potency

intranasal corticosteroid potency

A 1-year placebo-controlled clinical growth study was conducted in 150 pediatric patients (ages 3 to 9 years) to assess the effect of FLONASE Nasal Spray (single daily dose of 200 mcg, the maximum approved dose) on growth velocity. From the primary population of 56 patients receiving FLONASE Nasal Spray and 52 receiving placebo, the point estimate for growth velocity with FLONASE Nasal Spray was  cm/year lower than that noted with placebo (95% confidence interval ranging from  cm/year lower than placebo to  cm/year higher than placebo). Thus, no statistically significant effect on growth was noted compared to placebo. No evidence of clinically relevant changes in HPA axis function or bone mineral density was observed as assessed by 12-hour urinary cortisol excretion and dual-energy x-ray absorptiometry, respectively.

Media:

intranasal corticosteroid potencyintranasal corticosteroid potencyintranasal corticosteroid potencyintranasal corticosteroid potencyintranasal corticosteroid potency

http://buy-steroids.org