Kenalog steroid injection after rhinoplasty

The adverse effects of corticosteroids in pediatric patients are similar to those in adults (see ADVERSE REACTIONS ). Like adults, pediatric patients should be carefully observed with frequent measurements of blood pressure, weight, height, intraocular pressure, and clinical evaluation for the presence of infection, psychosocial disturbances, thromboembolism , peptic ulcers, cataracts, and osteoporosis. Pediatric patients who are treated with corticosteroids by any route, including systemically administered corticosteroids, may experience a decrease in their growth velocity. This negative impact of corticosteroids on growth has been observed at low systemic doses and in the absence of laboratory evidence of HPA axis suppression (ie, cosyntropin stimulation and basal cortisol plasma levels). Growth velocity may therefore be a more sensitive indicator of systemic corticosteroid exposure in pediatric patients than some commonly used tests of HPA axis function. The linear growth of pediatric patients treated with corticosteroids should be monitored, and the potential growth effects of prolonged treatment should be weighed against clinical benefits obtained and the availability of treatment alternatives. In order to minimize the potential growth effects of corticosteroids, pediatric patients should be titrated to the lowest effective dose.

Use in the Head and Neck Area: Small doses of local anesthetics injected into the head and neck area, including retrobulbar, dental and stellate ganglion blocks, may produce adverse reactions similar to systemic toxicity seen with unintentional intravascular injections of larger doses. Confusion, convulsions, respiratory depression and/or respiratory arrest and cardiovascular stimulation or depression have been reported. These reactions may be due to intra-arterial injections of the local anesthetic with retrograde flow to the cerebral circulation. Patients receiving these blocks should have their circulation and respiration monitored and be constantly observed. Resuscitative equipment and personnel for treating adverse reactions should be immediately available. Dosage recommendations should not be exceeded. (See DOSAGE AND ADMINISTRATION ).

Triamcinolone acetonide has been shown to cause birth defects in several animal species. As there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in pregnant women, the risk of birth defects in humans is not known. Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste should only be used during pregnancy only if the potential benefit justifies the potential risk to the fetus. Triamcinolone acetonide dental paste is classified as FDA pregnancy risk category C (Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks. Animal reproduction studies have shown an adverse effect on the fetus and there are no adequate and well-controlled studies in humans, but potential benefits may warrant use of the drug in pregnant women despite potential risks).

© 2007-2017, All Rights Reserved, The Macula Center, unless otherwise stated. The information provided on this website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute, supplant or augment any advice from your physician or other health care professional or medication label. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any eye or health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication or change your course of treatment without first consulting your physician. The Macula Center does not endorse, guarantee or make any claims for or about any products or information mentioned or linked to from this website.

Kenalog steroid injection after rhinoplasty

kenalog steroid injection after rhinoplasty

© 2007-2017, All Rights Reserved, The Macula Center, unless otherwise stated. The information provided on this website is for informational purposes only and is not intended to substitute, supplant or augment any advice from your physician or other health care professional or medication label. You should not use the information on this site for diagnosis or treatment of any eye or health problem or for prescription of any medication or other treatment. You should consult with a healthcare professional before starting any diet, exercise or supplementation program, before taking any medication, or if you have or suspect you might have a health problem. You should not stop taking any medication or change your course of treatment without first consulting your physician. The Macula Center does not endorse, guarantee or make any claims for or about any products or information mentioned or linked to from this website.

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